Why I’m Not Here for #WhiteGirlsRock

Image

The Black Girls Rock! Foundation was founded in 2006 as an organization dedicated to the empowerment of young women of color; a foundation committed to helping black and brown girls overcome the myriad of obstacles a misogynoiristic society places squarely in front of them. The Black Girls Rock! Awards are now featured on BET as a way of recognizing role models, encouraging teachings of self worth, and emphasizing the talents of extraordinary women of color who are otherwise unseen in American media.

Let me emphasize that last part. “Women of color who are otherwise unseen in American media.” We need Black Girls Rock! because black girls and women are almost invisible in American media. Because if you were a black girl growing up in this country, watching TV and movies and reading magazines like every other kid, looking for some representation of yourself as something beautiful or heroic, you would be sorely disappointed.

  • Black Girls Rock! is necessary because when you Google “beautiful women,” this is what you see.
  • Because when you look at the covers of Vogue, this is what you see.
  • Because when Vanity Fair printed their Hollywood issue, they put the black actresses on the back cover.
  • Because when a dark-skinned woman is put on the cover of a magazine, this is what is done to her.
  • Because Pixar has never made a movie featuring a black cartoon character.
  • Because a black actress has never won a drama series Lead Actress Emmy. (Although Kerry Washington will change that, I am certain.)
  • Because in 39 years, only three black women have been part of the cast of SNL.
  • Because, until Scandal, the only real place you could find black women in leading roles on television was Real Housewives of _______.
  • Because the “first black Disney Princess” was a frog for 95% of the movie.

I could go on. But I think you get the gist. What it comes down to is that black girls are missing representations of themselves in positive contexts. When they turn on the TV, they are missing. When they are looking at the cover of magazines like Vogue and Elle, they are missing. When they go to the movie theater, they are missing. For black women’s faces to appear in mainstream films, it seems they must be either wearing a maid’s apron or chains. So when Black Girls Rock! appears on the scene, ready to uplift and empower the girls who are so tragically neglected in American media, ready to showcase women of color who are smart and fun and beautiful and accomplished and positive, I am so here for it.

But let me tell you what I’m not here for.

I’m not here for #WhiteGirlsRock. The hashtag appeared on Twitter in an apparent response to Black Girls Rock! that aired on Sunday night with typical nonsense such as:

Image

And

Image

Let me tell you something, white folks. From one white person to another.

You are in everything. 99% of Hollywood movies feature your faces. 99% of magazine covers are covered in you. The Emmy Awards and Oscars are almost entirely you. If you Google “beautiful people” the screen is covered in white faces. Black girls (and boys) are taught from birth that there is one version of beauty, and it is you. Many black girls go their entire lives thinking they are ugly, thinking they need to be lighter, straighter, whiter in order to have value. Everything that you see every day that reaffirms your whiteness; every commercial that has a nice white lady embodying the perfect “mom;” every magazine that has blue eyes and bone-straight hair; every Hollywood blockbuster that has a leading lady with skin never darker than Halle Berry….all of these things are reinforcements of your identity that you take for granted.

You may be fat. You may have hair that curls up at the ends. You may even have acne. But your face is everywhere. Your people are everywhere. What in your heart recoils when you see Black Girls Rock? What bone in your body sees empowerment for black girls and thinks “that’s not fair”? Where is your bitterness rooted? What do you think has been taken from you when women of color are uplifted?

All of the things you take for granted are what you’re protecting when you shout down Black Girls Rock: your whiteness, the system that upholds your face as the supreme standard of beauty, your place in the center of a culture that demands people of color remain hidden in the margins, present but only barely and never overshadowing the white hero/heroine. Your discomfort with black girls who rock tells me that you prefer the status quo: you prefer for black faces to remain hidden, you prefer for America’s heroes to have white faces, you prefer for black actresses to wear aprons and chains.

This is not to say that white girls don’t rock. I’m white. I kind of rock. But this conversation isn’t about you, it isn’t about us. Why must everything always be about us? It doesn’t have to be. And it shouldn’t be. From one white person to another….please sit down. Queen Latifah is on and you’re blocking the screen.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

113 thoughts on “Why I’m Not Here for #WhiteGirlsRock

  1. “Where is your bitterness rooted? What do you think has been taken from you when women of color are uplifted?” — SO SO POWERFUL.

    This is exactly the reason I plan to start my own magazine for young women of color out there.

    Because when I was growing up, addicted to beauty and fashion magazines, none of it was even directed at black girls. No make-up tips for dark-skinned beauties, and no hair tutorials for naturals.

  2. […] an amazing and well articulated post entitled, “Why I’m Not Here #whitegirlsrock. (https://oliviaacole.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/why-im-not-here-for-whitegirlsrock/) It it she sites a number of reasons why black girls don’t have much to look to in the form […]

  3. This was an amazing article. It was intellectually stated and was just definitely what I needed to read this morning. There is hope for this humanity because of your article! :D

  4. Thank you for this post! You’ve become a #Whitegirlthatrocks for me. People are oblivious to the pain of others when it doesn’t affect them or their loved ones. Truth is, ALL GIRLS ROCK! It’s not just black women and girls who are under represented positively in mass media. Hispanic girls, asian girls, where is theire presence? I will be sharing your blog. God bless you and keep ROCKING for EQUALITY girl! #thebrokenvessel

  5. Reblogged this on TheBrokenVessel Speaks! and commented:
    Thank you for this post! You’ve become a #Whitegirlthatrocks for me. People are oblivious to the pain of others when it doesn’t affect them or their loved ones. Truth is, ALL GIRLS ROCK! It’s not just black women and girls who are under represented positively in mass media. Hispanic girls, asian girls, where is theire presence? I will be sharing your blog. God bless you and keep ROCKING for EQUALITY girl! #thebrokenvessel

  6. […] couple days ago this post was written in response to the hashtag “#Whitegirlsrock”. This is in response to the […]

  7. Olivia, that was great. People are so hung up on organisational affirmation that they don’t realise who needs it and who doesn’t. Yes, if you are a white girl, you may proceed to rock, at your discretion, LOL. We don’t need an organisation or a movement, the whole world is organised to our advantage. As a white person, I try to absorb messages like this from writers of colour and cringe at many of the sentiments put across by other white people. Thanks for not sucking! Sometimes, I really do think black girls on the whole rock a little harder, but they certainly need to get some more credit for it.

  8. Posted on @ByBlacks Twitter account, your insight and honesty is appreciated. Thanks for being a champion of racial equality!

  9. lesliecrobinson says:

    Amazing read, brilliantly stated. Thank you for that.

  10. liveincolor says:

    I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE your blog!!! Oh so well written. Thank you for being an eloquent voice for change! You are so on point w/ this piece. I discovered you from your article on The Huffington Post about The Best Man Holiday which I thoroughly enjoyed as well, such salient points. The way you speak to white privilege and patriarchy!! Girl, work!!!!

    I also blog at Live In Color w/ two other women. We write about inspiration, style and culture at http://www.liveincolor.org. Again, thank you! I am going to become a follower, and have already shared your blog w/ friends. Much love!

    Always Live In Color – E

  11. godtisx says:

    NEVER STOP WRITING. I really respect the fact that you “get,” this. It’s just very important for us to share with our own the bit of critical thinking about situations which may be missing, because at times there are things we simply cannot receive from anyone else. But I respect what you’ve written here because it’s a perspective I rarely hear, see or read white women acknowledge/explore. I mean, I know it’s difficult to look at things which we do which cast us in an unfavorable light but in order for us all to truly progress, and do so together, these types of issues must be addressed among white women (black women have their own issues), among women as a collective, then Americans in what we extend to the world, and on from there.

    Ugh. Okay, this is now a ramble. But this is a strong piece of work so I wanted to honestly respond, encourage and thank-you for it. :)

    • oliviaacole says:

      I appreciate your honest feedback and I thank you for stopping by. The truth is often uncomfortable, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t face it, especially when it comes to one another’s humanity. Again, thank you!

      • godtisx says:

        You are completely welcome Olivia. And you’re right, the truth can be very uncomfortable, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t face it. ESPECIALLY when it comes to one another’s humanity, yes.

        No, THANK-YOU!! :)

  12. […] Read full story via Why I’m Not Here for #WhiteGirlsRock | Olivia A. Cole. […]

  13. mslmc says:

    Oh my god, you are my hero!!!

Drop some knowledge

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: